About Us

First Year Experience, First Year Seminars, and Learning Community Seminars at the UConn form a seamless holistic academic component designed and committed to the success of all students in transition.

The core curriculum (CC) of these courses exists to help serve as the foundation upon which every first and second year student can build their academic successes. The CC aids students in developing the following essential skills: self-advocacy, critical & creative thinking, as well as information, technology, and resource literacy; preparing them for success in their personal, academic, and professional lives at UConn and beyond.

FYE core programming is comprised of three parts:

  1. First-Year Experience is an integral part of the Core that helps students adjust to the academic, social, and cultural life at UConn
  2. First Year Seminars focus on developing and enhancing research skills through expert lead special topics courses
  3. Learning Community Seminars explore academic, social, and cultural life at UConn through a discipline specific lens at beginning and advanced levels.
  4. Learning Community Service-Learning focus on activities specific to the theme of a learning community. Student discussions and critical reflections revolve around their specific service-learning experiences.

 

UNIV 1800  University Learning Skills                                                       
One credit. One class period. Prerequisite: Open to freshman and sophomore students only. A component of the First Year Experience (FYE) program, this course is intended to acquaint students with the university and expand their learning experiences in order for them to adjust to the new expectations they will face. Course involves assignments that will provide opportunities for students to enhance their academic and interpersonal skills.

Course Structure:
Courses will meet once a week for 50 minutes. Instruction will consist of lectures, discussions, and interactive workshops. Each course has a peer mentor who assists the instructor in course planning and implementation.

Key Course Learning Objectives:
LO1: Students will recognize the principles of critical and creative thinking, and apply them to all three realms of their first-year experience: academic, personal, and global.
LO2: Students will recognize their strengths and weaknesses and reflect on their personal growth as UConn students.
LO3: Students will recognize and engage with social and academic support services and enrichment opportunities offered at UConn.
LO4: Students will recognize and practice basic academic and professional skills necessary for undergraduate success at UConn.
LO5: Students will recognize the diversity of our world and practice basic skills needed to actively and ethically contribute to a globalized society.

UNIV 1810  Learning Communities Seminars
UNIV 1810 Courses are associated with either a Living-Learning Community (LLC) or a Learning Community (LC) and are open only to those students in the Learning Community related to the course.

Living-Learning Communities (LLC): Students in a LLC live together in a residence hall on campus, take a one-credit, UNIV 1810 class, and engage in related activities outside of class. In some communities, students enroll as a cohert in additional courses, such as English.

Learning Communities (LC): Students in a LC do not live together, but because they are in the same major or share a common interest, enroll in an UNIV 1810 course. Students come together and form a community through sharing common experiences.

UNIV 1820  First Year Seminars
One credit. One class period. Open to freshman and sophomore students only. May be repeated for credit with a change in content. Guided research or reading, discussion, and writing on topics of professional interest to the instructor.  Course materials promote independent learning and active engagement in the academic life of the university.

Course Structure:
Courses will meet once a week for 50 minutes. Instruction will consist of lectures, discussions, and interactive workshops.

Key Course Learning Objectives:
LO1: Students will work with an expert in a field of intellectual interest.
LO2: Students will engage actively in the academic life of the university, in or out of the classroom.
LO3: Students will conduct directed research and/or applied work.
Individual instructors will determine the best content and assessments for their intellectual projects.

Required Curricular Elements:
This course’s assignments are tailored to the topic of each course and do not replicate UNIV 1800 course assignments.

UNIV 1840 Learning Community Service-Learning
One credit. Activities, discussions, and critical reflections related to service-learning, community engagement, and/or experiential learning activities specific to the theme of a learning community. Students taking this course will be assigned a final grade of S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). This course may be repeated for a total of 2 semesters.

Course Structure: Students engage in a required number of service learning activities (varies by community: 20-32 hours per semester) and reflect on their work through assignments and community discussions.

Key Course Learning Goals: The goals of this course are to engage students in activities outside of the classroom that provide a rich context for what they are learning within their Learning Community as well as across their undergraduate curriculum. Students will examine their personal values and motivations and learn what it means to engage effectively and appropriately as a member of a global community with complex societal problems.

Key Course Learning Objectives:                                                                                                    LO1: Students will recognize and apply the principles of service-learning.
LO2: Students will recognize and apply critical and creative thinking.
LO3: Students will recognize and apply effective communication with diverse groups.
LO4: Students will reflect on the results of their own actions and learning experiences.

UNIV
3820
Advance Learning Community Seminar
One credit. Class hours by arrangement. Open only with instructor consent. This course is only open to sophomores, juniors, or seniors in learning communities. With a change in content, this course may be repeated twice for credit. A variable topics course designed to help students engage with the advanced academic and enrichment opportunities unique to their learning community.

Course Structure: The instructional pattern for this course is blended. It may include a series of lectures, discussion sections, discussion boards, collaborative research, and meetings, along with active projects in which the students participate.

Key Course Learning Objectives:
LO1: Students will work with their Faculty Director in their field of intellectual interest.
LO2: Students will engage actively in the academic life of the university, in or out of the classroom.
LO3: Students will conduct directed research and/or applied work relevant to the academic theme of the learning community.

Required Curricular Elements: Individual instructors will determine specific learning outcomes as well as the best content and assessments for their intellectual projects in the contexts of their learning communities.